Two more short reviews

Sheesh, I just can’t get it together to write proper reviews this month.  So here are two unproper ones.

One Perfect Day, Rebecca Mead

I love the title of this book, but it wasn’t as SHOCKING as I had hoped.  I was anticipating lots of SHOCKING anecdotes about the SHOCKING American tendency towards excess in weddings.  And there was a bit of that, sure, but the book is properly called One Perfect Day: The Selling of the American Wedding, and it is indeed mainly focused on the selling and marketing of weddings.  Mead talks about many aspects of the marketing – popular wedding locations like Vegas, selling of dresses, wedding planners, and bridal magazines.  The wedding industry is very industrious, but not very SHOCKING.  I want to read more about weddings, with hopefully more SHOCKING stuff, and more about the wedding participants versus the wedding industry people.  Thanks to Schatzi for the recommendation!

Power of Three, Diana Wynne Jones

And now for something completely different: one of the very few books by Diana Wynne Jones that I truly loved the first time I read it. Power of Three is about three races of people that live on a Moor – regular people, who live in mounds under the Moor; Dorig, who live in the water; and Giants, who are – you know – us.  The titular Three are the three races, or else the three Powers (Sun for the regular people, Earth for the Giants, and Moon for the Dorig), or else the three siblings – Ceri and Ayna and Gair.  There are many groups of three in the book, lots of sets of three powers coming together.

Diana Wynne Jones always writes a disconnect between how characters perceive themselves, and how others see them, and their emotional journeys always lead to self-awareness.  Hooray for self-awareness, perhaps the personal quality most valued by me in myself and other people.  The “regular people”, Ayna and Gair and Ceri, understand the world in one way at the start of the book – they are people, and the Dorig and Giants are enemies to be feared – and they gradually find that they’re all, essentially, the same.  It’s nice.

  • Awww, I love DWJ! Haven’t read this yet. I should! I should!

    • Do! What others of her books have you read? I love to recommend DWJ books!

  • I’ve been looking for more DWJ to read, after loving Fire and Hemlock – perhaps this is where I should head next? (and I can’t get myself together for reviews either!)

    • Fire and Hemlock is the best of her books (I think) by a good margin. I’m not sure Power of Three is the next best one – some of my favorites are Howl’s Moving Castle, Archer’s Goon, and the rather sad Homeward Bounders. I am rereading Witch Week right now – it’s another favorite of mine, but you really need to have read Charmed Life and The Lives of Christopher Chant to appreciate it properly. She’s a wonderful writer, one of my very favorites!

  • Kids today, just looking for a QUICK THRILL.

    Well, perhaps what I discover in Cinderella Dreams: The Allure of the Lavish Wedding will be more shocking!

  • My wedding was so plain as to be practically non-existant! It was just the two of us in a courthouse in Reno, ha ha. It was great! My sister is getting married soon and already she’s having so much headache over wedding plans. She says its not going to be a huge affair but I am waiting to see!

    As to Diana Wynne Jones- I have always loved most the first book I read of hers, Dogsbody. None of the rest ever affected me the same way. This one does sound interesting, though- perhaps I’ll give it a try. I don’t want to give up on her yet!

    • Marriage is not on my radar right now, but I know when I get married it’s going to be a nightmare. I have a massive Roman Catholic family (35 first cousins altogether!). I may end up eloping, just to save myself the headaches.

      I’m trying to think of another of her books that’s like Dogsbody. What else have you read of hers?

  • Diana Wynne Jones always writes a disconnect between how characters perceive themselves, and how others see them, and their emotional journeys always lead to self-awareness.

    Yes! That’s exactly what I love about her books (and her characters). They have a lot of depth in them. 😀

    • They do! And it’s not just self-awareness, it’s awareness of the reality of their environments. They move from narrow-mindedness to tolerance and acceptance. I love her so. I am making a heart with my fingers right now, to express my love. 😛

  • We did elope, and that was one of the reasons- I wanted a small, simple wedding, his large family would have insisted on a big to-do, so we avoided the entire issue!

    I’ve also read Fire and Hemlock, and I think I tried Archer’s Goon but didn’t get far. I know the others I’ve attempted got abandoned so quickly I can’t even remember what they were. That’s sad!