Reading the End Bookcast, Ep.43: Underutilized Settings and Attica Locke’s Pleasantville

Happy Wednesday! This week, we’re sharing some thrilling podcast news, talking about time and place settings we’d like to see in more books, and reviewing Attica Locke’s new mystery Pleasantville. You can listen to the podcast in the embedded player below or download the file directly here to take with you on the go.

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Links of interest

Vulture reports on JK Rowling’s non-prequel play.

The Vox article about leading slavery tours at a plantation.

Books mentioned (those that have been reviewed in this space are linked to the review):

Ada or Ardor, Vladimir Nabokov (podcast readalong!)

The Cutting Season, Attica Locke
We Were Liars, E. Lockhart
Bittersweet, Miranda Beverly-Whittemore
Amelia Peabody series, by Elizabeth Peters (the first is Crocodile on the Sandbank)
The Night Villa, Carol Goodman
The Art of Fielding, Chad Harbach
Where’d You Go Bernadette, Maria Semple
Troubling a Star, Madeleine L’Engle
The Shadow of the Moon and The Far Pavilions, M. M. Kaye
Sleepy Hollow the FOX show (what a great show)
The Night Circus, Erin Morgenstern
Americanah, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Hiding in Plain Sight, Nuruddin Farah
On Sal Mal Lane, Ru Freeman
The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency, Alexander McCall Smith
A Beautiful Place to Die, Malla Nunn
The Age of Miracles, Karen Thompson

Pleasantville, Attica Locke (reviewed!)

Emma, Alexander McCall Smith (to be read for next time!)
Prep, Curtis Sittenfeld (roundly loathed by Whiskey Jenny)

Get at me on Twitter, email the podcast, and friend me (Gin Jenny) and Whiskey Jenny on Goodreads. Or if you wish, you can find us on iTunes (and if you enjoy the podcast, give us a good rating! We appreciate it very very much).

Credits
Producer: Captain Hammer
Photo credit: The Illustrious Annalee
Song is by Jeff MacDougall.

  • Grad

    In The Kingdom Of Ice by Hampton Sides is a wonderful book about Polar exploration! I read it earlier this year and can recommend it highly.

  • I’m just ten minutes into the podcast (I have the tiniest commute), but I just wanted to say right away that yay! readalong!

    That’s all, thanks.

    (Also, I SO agree with Whisky Jenny on how uninteresting J.K. Rowling’s stories post-HP sound. I kinda like the one with Sirius and James, but… Umbridge? Why? Why would you want to write about *Umbridge*? I don’t get it, where’s my story about Lily being awesome and kicking Sirius Black’s ass, it’s what I want to know)

    • Yay readalong! We are very excited too! I hope you’ll join us — Whiskey Jenny in particular will die of delight if we end up having listener participation. 🙂

  • Amy

    Hello! I have a book recommendation involving tennis (though it’d be a stretch to say it’s all about tennis): The Garden of the Finzi-Continis is about an group of young Italian-Jewish college students who spend the summer playing tennis at the estate of the Finzi-Contini family in 1938 Italy. It’s very lovely and dreamy. There’s an exploration of Judaism, an insight into the racial laws of Italy, unrequited love, and tennis. Also, I feel like with all the WWII literature out there, Italy is not very often a setting. But it is totally possible that is due to a gap in my reading.

    p.s., I previously wrote in about not loving Elizabeth Peters. Update: I read The Camelot Caper on your recommendation and lovedddd it!

    • Oh wow, thanks for the awesome recommendation! Whiskey Jenny’s added it to her GR and so have I, because it sounds amazing even though I do not care about tennis so much. And I am deeeee-lighted that you enjoyed The Camelot Caper. Isn’t it an absolute dear of a book? A lot of her books by Barbara Michaels are along similar lines — lightly spoofing spooky mystery stories while also being excellent examples of that type of story.

  • Christy

    Books that popped into my head:
    Archaeological setting – Shadowy Horses by Susanna Kearsley.
    Antarctica – The White Darkness by Geraldine McCaughrean