Honestly Some Joy in Link Format: A Links Round-Up

I decided to take a break from having sad links and only have happy links. So you can look forward to some gay Sulu, bonkers Oscar Wilde adjacence, and Catullus telling people to go fuck themselves (he does that so well).

Bahahaha Constance Holland (nee Lloyd; formerly Wilde) has a fake gravestone at a cemetery in Spain. OF COURSE SHE DOES God I love Oscar Wilde stories.

American literature needs indie publishers, says The Atlantic. They don’t exactly go deep on the point that indie presses are an avenue for publishing more marginalized voices, so if y’all have a recent article that gets to that point, link me and I’ll add it!

The wonderful and attrrrrrractive John Cho on gay Sulu and his concerns about same. What a cool guy John Cho seems like.

Speaking of Star Trek, CBS/Paramount recently released new, draconian guidelines for Star Trek fan films; KJ of Lady Business goes in on why these are terrible.

I cherished Natalie Portman and Jonathan Safran Foer’s unbearable fake email exchange, of course. The Millions has uncovered a correspondence between Portman and Cormac McCarthy — what a treasure — and Jezebel shared the emails of two of its own staff people as well. What a great, not at all not-real, trend.

Daisy Dunn loves Catullus. And just — y’all, I just love Catullus so much. Okay that’s all I have to say. I really love Catullus.

First-time authors Yaa Gyasi and Hua Hsu interview each other about book ideas and racist grade school teachers.

The fab Elizabeth Minkel breaks down what’s so silly about those peril-peril-fan-entitlement articles, over at The New Statesman.

Have a wonderful weekend, you beautiful people! There is a tiny tiny papillon puppy in my neighborhood, and I plan to lurk the neighborhood pretending to be hunting for Pokemons but actually in hopes of catching a glimpse of this tiny preposterous puppy.

Let’s Hope August Is Better: A Links Round-Up

Alton Sterling was killed in Louisiana (which is where I live) on Tuesday, July 5th. Roxane Gay talks about his life and his death. Rembert Browne on people who don’t want anyone not like them to exist at all. Ijeoma Olua on the tragedy in Dallas and how we should (and shouldn’t) respond to it. Ta-Nehisi Coates on the unbreakable link between violence by police officers and violence against them.

In the wake of Black Lives Matter pulling out of the Pride parade in San Francisco due to increased police presence, some thoughts on the disconnect between the two major civil rights fights of our day.

A profile of our nation’s top ASL interpreter for hip-hop artists. My one complaint about this article is that it does not include sufficient videos of Amber Galloway Gallego being awesome.

Mother Jones reporter Shane Bauer spent four months as a guard in a for-profit prison in Louisiana and wrote a massive report on it. It’s basically exactly what you’d expect from our broken-ass prison system.

Suki Kim, author of Without You There Is No Us, talks about categorizing her book (a work of investigative journalism) as a memoir, and the persistent devaluing of women’s work. It made me scrutinize my own reaction to the ethics of her book, and I hope I’ll be more cognizant of that when reviewing journalism by women in the future.

Why plots are so important (also, has anyone read Emily Barton’s book, The Book of Esther? I am tentatively interested but want more information from y’all).

Your summer comic book recommendations, from Kieron Gillen, Kate Leth, and Marjorie Liu. Bid adieu to your productivity.

Queerbaiting in Captain America

The Millions released their book preview for the second half of 2016, and it is EPIC. I also discovered just yesterday that there’s a nonfiction one too.

THE SCIENCE OF BOOKS: All books everywhere with no exceptions whatsoever1 follows one of six emotional arcs. Oh how I love a taxonomy, my precious.

Rumaan Alam inquires what makes a book diverse, and wonders if his own novel — about straight white women — can be considered diverse.2

On Twitter last week I told a story about a good dog from history that doesn’t die tragically. You can read that story here.

Finally, and completely frivolously, please enjoy this wonderful review of the Blake Lively shark movie by Wesley Morris (one of my favorite cultural critics ever), which is brilliant on the subject of interchangeable celebrities.

  1. This may be hyperbole
  2. Pet peeve: A BOOK cannot be diverse. Groups can be diverse, an individual cannot. Dictionary Curmudgeon Gin Jenny urges you to get off her lawn.

Sad and Angry Week: A Links Round-Up

I don’t know what to say about the hate crime against queer people of color in Orlando this past weekend. I won’t say the killer’s name because we know that intense coverage of these guys inspires copycats do to the same. Instead I want to link to NPR’s article about the people who were murdered. Here also is a round-up from NPR’s Code Switch of responses from queer Latinx folks.

The element of the fantastical in The Boxcar Children is their coherence to a Protestant work ethic.

I am THE MOST susceptible to this kind of sadness. Just read enough of this article to accept the word “cluey” into our vocabulary (i.e., the story about the board game Clue), AND THEN STOP, because it is genuinely unbearable to read the rest of these stories, and that’s not hyperbole, I really mean it, for God’s sake don’t be like me and read the whole cluey-ass thing.

“Two powerful men being friends is an inevitability. Two powerful women being friends is a conspiracy”: On how the concept of cliques is used to express suspicion of close female friendship.

Plagiarism in the age of self-publishing.

Thoughts on diversity and publishing from Nikesh Shukla, including some glorious side-eye for stories about middle-aged white male writers having affairs with their lovely young female students.

“The shift in language that trades the word ‘integration’ for ‘diversity’ is critical. Here in [New York City], as in many, diversity functions as a boutique offering for the children of the privileged but does little to ensure quality education for poor black and Latino children.” Nikole Hannah-Jones on the decision to send her daughter to public school in New York City.

Interrogation techniques that aren’t torture.

Down with periods! Up with line breaks!

Internet Messes You Might Have Missed: A Links Round-Up

Happy Friday, team! The best news from this week is that the NPR Code Switch podcast has finally dropped. You can read an interview with pilot hosts Gene Demby and Shereen Marisol Meraji about their Process here.

Why your brain is not a computer, and calling it one is messing up brain science.

Women in sci-fi are reaching new heights (including some discussion of the Hugos and that whole mess).

Including a mango (or not) in a novel about Pakistan.

In defense of YA love triangles, which represent possible identity choices for the (mostly) heroines. Plus some bonus nose-wrinkling at the near-exclusive heteronormativity of the way these love triangles tend to play out.

People think you’ve stolen their lives for your writing even if you actually haven’t. (I secretly think that the moral of this is steal whatever you want and screw ’em, cause they’re going to be mad at you no matter what you do.) My favorite part of this is what she says about other writers stealing from her life and getting her utterly wrong. FASCINATING.

In case you missed that mess of an essay at the Antioch Review, here’s an excellent response to it over at The Millions.

Oh, and in case you messed that mess of a CAPTAIN AMERICA BEING A NAZI (I ranted about it on Twitter), Jess Plummer over at Panels has some thoughts on it for you, as does teaberryblue on Tumblr.

Plus, some sighing as regards complaints of fan entitlement, from Bibliodaze and Megan Purdy. And a particularly superb piece from the always-superb J. A. Micheline addressing the question of who benefits from this kind of rhetoric (spoiler alert: it’s the dominant power structure!).

“I think ‘Frog and Toad’ was really the beginning of him coming out.” Queering the narrative of Frog and Toad. You’re welcome.

Side-eyes for Tina Fey: A links round-up

Who debunks the debunkers?

Get pumped: NPR’s Code Switch, your source for excellent conversations about race and American culture, will soon be a podcast! The first episode drops May 31st.

Sharing your favorite stories with your kids: An impossibly adorable story starring Luke Skylocker.

A seriously great black feminist roundtable in response to bell hooks’s response to Beyonce’s new music video; and a reminder why it’s awesome to live now and have all these amazing, smart, thoughtful voices available for us to listen to.

Sob! The Toast is closing! Where will I get my art history jokes now?

Tina Fey is kind of being a jerk about racism, but it’s not like you’re surprised. Zeba Blay on being a fan of feminist TV while black.

How writers will steal your life for their books.

Richard Sherman and Eurovision: A Links Round-Up

How the whales have won (at Sea World). Note that this article describes people having their limbs torn off by orcas. Also note that orcas have never killed a human in the wild, I JUST MENTION IT.

“We are not in a golden age of nuance”: A really remarkably good review of Marvel’s Civil War, from Linda Holmes at NPR’s Monkeysee.

We really do seem to talk about trigger warnings more than encounter them, don’t we? Laurie Penny responds to Stephen Fry’s outburst of rage re: trigger warnings.1

Why white people tend to be so terrible about discussing race, and what to do about it.

Okay, I resisted reading this story about a guy adopting a dog in Skyrim, but that was nuts and this story is amazing.

Negotiating a raise while a woman: Advice from McSweeney’s.

Richard Sherman goes undercover as a Lyft driver.

This goddamn election: A frustrated op-ed by Lindy West.

Eurovision is going to be broadcast and streamed in the US for the first time ever, dear God it is all my dreams coming true.

Regarding Asian Americans, representation, and the #whitewashedOUT hashtag.

A thoughtful editorial from Kirkus editor Vicky Smith on identifying character race in reviews.

  1. Note to celebrities: Probably don’t make fun of kids who’ve been sexually abused. It makes you look like a dick.

Gay Stuff in Fandoms: A Links Round-Up

Well, it’s been a nice regular week! I knocked out some library books. I killed some caterpillars (my kill count stands at 29 as of this writing). I hung out with some friends. Sampled mac and cheeses from two different restaurants. Just in general living my best life.

A history of Gay Batman that is everything Pop Culture Happy Hour listeners have come to expect from Glen Weldon. Also, he adorably puts an apostrophe in front of shippers, bless his heart.

Speaking of gay stuff and fandoms (but I repeat myself), Clare of The Literary Omnivore wrote a brilliant and fascinating piece for Lady Business about the secret undergound history of Han Solo/Luke Skywalker slash. Stop by and praise her, please.

STILL speaking of gay stuff and fandoms, and then I swear I’ll move on, here’s an excellent history of femslash on Jezebel. Fair warning, it spoils a bunch of recent shows including Vampire Diaries, The 100, and Empire.

The burden of “themes” when we talk about African literature.

I love college football, but yep: This has to change.

But. But if we have misunderstood dodos so badly, why is there no new picture of what they really looked like, with their skin on?

Why one farm in Kansas gets regular visits from the FBI; or, the craziest thing you will read about IP mapping maybe ever.

Unconscious people don’t want tea: A Metro Police cartoon video about sexual consent (and tea).

Regarding Sherman Alexie’s decision to cancel his event in North Carolina.

Have a fabulous weekend, ducklings!