The Future of Football: A Links Round-Up

IT IS FRIDAY. Every week is a thousand years long, and I have a weird SF video thing to share with you first:

What will football look like in the future (the far, far future)? SB Nation has a go at figuring it out.

Following the death of Otto Wambier, journalist and Korea expert Suki Kim argues that tourism to North Korea serves no legitimate purpose.

Some people get very mad when JK Rowling says stuff about Harry Potter. My pal Ben Lindbergh argues at The Ringer that there’s no point being mad about it.

This movie review is magical. I loved every word of it, from the first line all the way through to the ending. Props.

This book review is also magical. Reviews are magic. Thank you, God, for giving us reviews like these.

Three books about (kind of) One Direction fandom that sound great. And I mean, one of them is great. Cause I read it. And I really liked it.

Janet Mock on “pretty privilege,” which is for sure a real thing.

In honor of the Fourth of July, Karan Mahajan writes about the American institution of small talk (and its trickiness to master).

Juliet Litman weighs in on the mess that the Bachelor franchise has made of itself.

The Public Religion Research Institute has a new study about the way Americans in different demographics perceive discrimination in this country and what should be done about it.

This story about the Philip Pullman bid in Authors for Grenfell Tower will never not make me teary.

What are the books that colleges are giving incoming freshman to read? My main takeaway from this article is that everyone else got to read awesome stuff and we had to read goddamn Fast Food Nation.

Have a great weekend, my lovelies! I will be making homemade Oreos, editing podcast, constructing a dollhouse, and hopefully getting some reading done and WATCHING BLACK SAILS OMG.

Demand the Hurston-Hughes Road Trip Movie We All Deserve: A Links Round-Up

Happy Friday, everyone!

How to cull your books: The Awl guide. Let me tell you my method, team. Take all the books. Line them up on the floor, right to left, by how much you love them. Then draw a line somewhere in the middle of that long line of books and cull everything to the left of your line. Boom. Done.

More on fan entitlement (and a bit of side-eye for Steven Moffat, which I am never not here for) from The Mary Sue. I’m really digging Maddie Myers’s work on The Mary Sue these days, y’all! Go follow her on Twitter, I like where her head’s at.

Speaking of things I’m never not here for, Jonathan Franzen gave an interview to Slate and it’s everything I could have asked. He has never been in love with a black woman and he suspects poors don’t like him because he enunciates and wears glasses. What a great world.

Mm, Elizabeth Minkel gets real on why she doesn’t believe that The Cursed Child is fanfic.

Holy crap, y’all, Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes went on a road trip one time. They had funsies. Let’s turn that into a movie.

Aaron Sorkin’s online screenwriting class is everything you want it to be. Ben Lindbergh reports for The Ringer.

Matt Zoller Seitz on the decline of the serialized TV drama.

Why Twitter attracts trolls.

Diversity in book publishing. The last two years have seen a marked increase in books by POC authors, but the staff of the publishing industry remains overwhelmingly white.

Being stuck without a book is the worst. I believe we can all agree on that. When was the last time you needed a book and didn’t have one?

Reading the End Bookcast, Ep.62 – The Only Rule Is It Has to Work

It’s baseball season! And we’re celebrating by welcoming our friend Ben Lindbergh to the podcast to talk about his new book (coauthored with Sam Miller), The Only Rule Is It Has to Work: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team.

Only Rule Is It Has to Work

You can listen to the podcast in the embedded player below or download the file directly here to take with you on the go.

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Listen to Ben and Sam’s interview with Stompers alum Santos Saldovar on their podcast Effectively Wild.

This is Lil Sebastian West. I’m calling him that because he lives in the western part of the country. You get it.

Only Rule Is It Has to Work

You can find Ben on Twitter and at his book’s website, and you can listen to his and Sam’s baseball podcast, Effectively Wild, here. Get at me on Twitter, email the podcast, and friend me (Gin Jenny) and Whiskey Jenny on Goodreads. Or if you wish, you can find us on iTunes (and if you enjoy the podcast, give us a good rating! We appreciate it very very much).